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JÓL

JÓL / Saturday 30th November 2019 - Saturday 18th January 2020

JÓL is the old Norse celebration of the Winter Solstice and the returning of the light after the short days and long nights of winter. This exhibition will feature works in wood, metal, textiles, ceramics and glass. It will concentrate on beautifully hand crafted objects to either use or give as gifts over the festive period with an emphasis on cosy nights by the fire, a sense of peace and tranquility as a welcome antidote to the frenetic, throw away culture of the modern Christmas celebration.

Exhibitors include Liadain Aiken, Nadine Anderson, Malin Applegren Bailey, Benefield Spencer Glass, Yasha Butler, Daniel Crawshaw, Alex deVol, Rachel Eardley, Ria Fell, Sheena Hamson, Mari Ishikawa, Reiko Kaneko, Luna Lighting, Louisa Loakes, David Mellor, Nikolay Sardamov, Anna Silverton, Lorna Singleton, Mourne Textiles, Deborah Tseng, Hannah Uprichard, David White, Joanna Waterhouse, William Waterhouse, Pottery West, Wood Woven and Mizuyo Yamashita.

Private View: Friday 29th November 5.30pm – 7.30pm

Curated by Julie Falkingham

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This all began from my desire to create sustainable, ethical & functional  garments that leave a happy footprint on our earth. Ireland has a rich history of knitwear, which has come to me through my Granny, Mother and Sister.  All wonderful craftswomen.

Embracing a slow and considered approach, my creations are born in the practical. Yet they speak for themselves in their irreverent colour combinations and playful patterns that push the boundaries of traditional Irish knitwear.

I have had a meandering journey around the world of stitches and rows. It started age six when I was learning to ride a red bicycle without stabilisers and it wasn’t going so well. My Mum sat me down at the kitchen counter and taught me to knit instead. I remember the brown wool vividly and took to it quickly. Confidence regained I was soon whizzing around on the bike.

A First Class Honors degree in Interior Design gave me a strong technical foundation. This  paved the way to garment construction and knit calculations, that were mastered at the Grafton Academy in Dublin and Knit-1 Studio in Brighton.  Having always loved making, especially anything pernickety, knitting was the perfect craft for my meticulous eye and nimble hands.

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‘I have been basketmaking for more than 20 years and primarily work in Willow and Rush with a smattering of Cane and Raffia; my main focus is Rush and we harvest as a family in waterways around Ely each Summer. I make to commission as well as having signature baskets that are for sale direct from my home workshop and the Babylon Arts Gallery, Waterside Ely. A range of 9 products are available at two National Trust properties; Anglesey Abbey shop and the visitors centre at Wicken Fen Nature Reserve. At the latter I teach a number of basketry workshops through the year( check their website for details and booking).I also teach 1-4 people at my home workshop and tailor these to individual interests both in terms of techniques, abilities and materials. I also teach courses at Cottenham Village College and Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. I am a Yeoman Basketmaker to the Worshipful Company of Basketmakers and an active committee member of The Basketmakers’ Association ,organising the Spring and Autumn courses. I am also a member of Cambridge Open Studios. ‘ – Nadine Anderson

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Malin Appelgren designs and crafts all her products in her workshop in Österlen in southern Sweden, using nothing but her hands, her craft, brass and pewter – and crucially, plenty of time. She learnt this handicraft from her grandfather, Karl Erik Torssell, who taught her everything he knew.

She relies on instinct, and the experience she’s built up. When she sits down at the stock with a piece of metal in front of her, time passes but slowly. The ‘now’ solely consists of focused attention. From here time stretches back, so she can find her place in this tradition. And ahead, towards forms yet not conceived.

Her craftsmanship is all about this. About time and a heart-like rhythm of a beating hammer.

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All of our glass is made by hand, without moulds or machinery, using traditional offhand glassblowing techniques. This means that the completed vessel was formed entirely at temperatures exceeding 700°c , it was given its shape, made to a specific height, and decorated in a temperature range where glass is still moving and can be affected by gravity, centrifugal force and hand tools. Glassblowing is a continuous process, in the sense that making any particular object cannot be interrupted lest the glass lose temperature too quickly and shatter. Only when the piece is completed, as you see it now, is the temperature allowed to fall to 500°c and then put away in an oven to cool slowly to room temperature overnight.

Because of this, there are slight variations between pieces that reflect the fluid nature of glassblowing and the extreme sensitivity of the hot material. You may see tool marks near the lip of a pieces, or notice that the decorative line work may not be perfectly vertical—these slight imperfections, along with the punty mark on the bottom of each piece, are indicative of handblown glass and make each piece distinctive.

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I am an artist, designer and maker who is passionate about helping people experience beauty in the everyday. I work with clay to create objects that add a sense of calming poetry to our lives. From sculptural vessels to simple wall hangings, my work gives people the tools to craft spaces that they love living in. I am drawn to humble forms and earthy surfaces that have a depth of texture. My style is minimal, elegant and organic; and my main sources of inspiration are ancient pots and the beauty of the imperfect.

I coil build my vessels with a toothy grogged clay and then brush a wash of earthy pigments over their surface. This process allows me to create modern vessels that pay homage to forgotten lands.

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‘In my photo based landscapes I am drawn to qualities unique to the medium of painting and its history. To me a painting is a hand-made object brought into fruition over time. Once complete it might stand as testament to its own distillation or achieve a duality where recollection and the apparent immediacy of an image are combined in a single statement. 

In chromatically sparse renderings of remote terrain I aim to achieve a sense of monumentality and the ‘sublime’ in works of varying scale. Avoiding lists of components I try to occupy the pictorial spaces where other painters may have been, whether they be the dark vistas of Bosch or the delicate inflections of Morandi I render empty scenes that only hint at human presence. 

I have a particular approach to my source material, taking my own photographs and looking for common structures in both familiar and strange places – small instances, magnified, adjusted and re-rendered in oil paint. There is a steady methodology to my production- squaring up 5’ x7’ prints I work logically through the detail, concentrating on recapturing the whole.

Maybe the paintings invite the response of a ‘double take’ appearing to be something they are not: immediate, photographic, familiar, yet distant, ephemeral and resonant in a wholly other way, material objects in their own right that suggest the realm of the sublime.’ – Daniel Crawshaw

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Alexander deVol is a designer, artist and maker who’s work investigates the material properties of wood and their transferal into other materials.  deVol uses a mix of traditional casting methods and new technologies to document the natural behaviour and movement of the vessels he makes in ‘green wood’ whilst taking care to preserve the features he feels are aesthetically synonymous with the material’s origin.
“My work is an ongoing investigation into material, I have always been fascinated by a diverse range of both natural and synthetic media. Much of my work is conceived in wood and metamorphosed into a new medium, with details most indicative of the tree juxtaposed by a contrasting material. My intention is to create artefacts and installations which allow audiences to observe and consider material in new ways.”
deVol works with the unseasoned wood from trees that are recently felled and high in moisture, in this state wood is still to undergo a dramatic process of change and given appropriate conditions will morph a form into a new organic shape as it dries. The final outcome is an object sculpted collaboratively by both maker and material.

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‘At the age of 15 I got the taste for silversmithing when I accompanied my Grandpa to an evening class which I continued going to until I left home to study 3D crafts at Brighton University.

After graduating in 1999, I set up my workshop at Cross St. Studios in Hove where I worked for the next 11 years. I started my business producing a range of silver charms & creating my Polaroid drawings.

My work has developed over the years with a strong illustrative theme running through it. My jewellery has gone from miniature kitchen utensils to the intricate miniature drawings on coins, whilst my drawings of kitchen interiors have moved into printmaking & hand embroidering onto vintage textiles.

I am inspired by the simple day to day objects in our homes & like to bring life back to things that have little purpose in the way we live our lives today. My coin jewellery & artwork can be found in homes all over the world.

I am currently living in West Somerset with my husband & two young sons, where I continue to enjoy making & developing my work.’ – Rachel Eardley

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Each earring set and leather accessory is unique; painted, cut and assembled by hand.

Using leather dye, as well as specialist acrylic paint, and focusing on colour and shape, Ria uses her experience in illustration and surface pattern design, to produce wearable leather paintings. Once complete, the leather is then cut and assembled by hand in her North West studio.

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Sheena is a maker of leather. She creates bespoke items including luxury wallets, purses, card cases, handbags, belts, jewellery boxes and display cases all using exotic and fine leather and luxury textiles.

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Mari Ishikawa studied Jewellery and photography at Academy of Fine Arts, Munich Germany. Since then she has been a practicing contemporary jeweller exhibiting internationally. Her works are in various international public collections including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, The Museum of Arts and Design, New York and Die Neue Sammlung, Munich. She has given workshops in Germany, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Estonia, Japan, Thailand and Chile.

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After studying design at Central Saint Martins, Reiko started out designing a range of products which she had made around the world but it was the joy of working with ceramicists in The Potteries, and tapping into over two centuries of knowledge in fine bone china production that led her to concentrate on ceramics.

Reiko spent her childhood in Japan and still makes frequent visits. Japan has not only been an inspiration for the elegant simplicity to which she strives, but the key to her appreciation of craft and craftsmanship. Reiko has collaborated with makers in different materials both in England and in Japan.

Reiko also tutors part time on the Ceramic Design MA and BA course at Staffordshire university in Stoke on Trent.

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Louisa Loakes is a textile artist based in Peckham, London, who takes inspiration from various cultures, including the block printing heritage of Northern India. Although formally trained as a painter at Wimbledon School of Art (now Wimbledon College of Art), she found herself increasingly drawn to print, deciding to specialise in both printmaking and the traditional block printing. Today, Loakes describes herself as an “artist/block printer”, combining hand painted and block printed designs in a range of fabrics.

She often uses natural forms and lines to inspire designs, working from sketches or photographs of plants, animals and other features of the environment. She tends to use a muted colour palette, with a splash of brighter tones here and there to bring the design together. In her prints, you can see how traditional Indian motifs and design traditions have informed her work. However, her designs remain modern and fresh at the same time.

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I could never bear to take the fairy lights down after Christmas and sought to recreate the sense of well being they always inspired. While busy with a career in publishing and bringing up my two children,I was persuaded to join a Saturday ceramics class by a friend and was instantly overwhelmed by a feeling of belonging. After completing a City & Guilds I then joined Albion Square Studio and following a June visit to Tuscany where I became entranced by the nightly dance of a thousand fireflies, I started to develop lighting ideas. In 2001 I began work on the first series of Luna Lights in press moulded stoneware from Kate Malone’s Balls Pond Studios and started regularly filling her enormous kiln with pierced spheres, cubes and cylinders in high-fired stoneware.

When Kate decided to redevelop the building, I joined Cockpit Arts, an inspirational creative hub in the heart of Bloomsbury and since then have extended the range to include slip-cast lights, oil burners and more recently, in order to recycle the scraps left over from the casting, thrown porcelain tealights which also neatly filled the gaps in the kiln created by the bigger work. My delicately pierced, thrown porcelain mini tea lights were thus a bi-product but swiftly became the main focus of Luna Lighting and are now sold and collected worldwide. I love the endless possibilities of this tiny canvas and am constantly searching for new quirky, playful images that will translate into little dots. The latest collection is based on icons of mid century furniture and lighting design, another passion of mine. I have also been developing a chandelier made up of hundreds of fine porcelain fish (after coming back from the sardine festival in Lisbon with a souvenir cookie cutter) and I hope to explore this new avenue over them coming months.

I will never tire of the translucent, tactile quality of porcelain, how light brings it alive and the astonishing alchemy of the firing process.

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The company was set up by David Mellor, Royal Designer for Industry. Mellor was a key figure in British design with an international reputation as designer, manufacturer and shopkeeper. Born in Sheffield and originally trained as a silversmith, he always specialised in metalwork and is particularly famous for his cutlery which won numerous design awards and which is in many international collections.

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Pottery West is Catherine and Matt West’s ceramics studio which they work out of in Sheffield, UK. Established in 2015, they design and craft small-batch wheel-thrown ceramic homeware with a emphasis on simple, ergonomic forms and tactile functional glazes.

‘Inspiration is sculptural and painterly in the most elementary ways; texture, tone, light and form. We work mainly in stoneware and fire in an oxidised environment. Matt is the lead thrower; Catherine specialises in glaze development.’

 

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Sardamov is renown across Europe for his work using both precious metals and re-cycled materials including rubber bicycle inner tubes.

His work is meticulously designed and made and characterised by poignant conceptual concerns. His collections vary from heart felt messages to social commentary

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All my vases and bowls are one off and wheel-thrown in porcelain. I search for shapes I find beautiful, making incremental modifications and teasing out new combinations of intriguing form. My pots have changed gradually over time; similar themes reoccur alongside new discoveries as I search for the perfect shape and surface.

I love working with porcelain and delight in the delicious throwing texture of it. I punctuate, interrupt and hone the profile of each piece by turning, making incised bands which are then highlighted by tactile glazes which reflect or absorb the light on their edges.

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I weave oak swill baskets and other woven products using wood coppiced in South Cumbria

I am a craftswoman specialising in woven wooden products. I cut and prepare the wood by hand, managing and restoring coppice woodland in a responsible and renewable way & seeing the whole process from the tree to the finished product. The Oak for my products is coppiced locally in South Cumbria.

I enjoy honouring the generations of swillers before me by creating baskets in the traditional patterns. These have a rich heritage based on the baskets from the Furness area of South Cumbria (old Lancashire). Their production cannot be mechanised and so are made using the simple hand tools and techniques used by generations of swillers before me.

I graduated in 2013 as a coppice apprentice of the Bill Hogarth MBE Memorial Apprenticeship Trust following three years of intensive tuition in coppice woodland management and crafts.

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Mourne Textiles’ luxurious narrow and wide Scarves blend the soft yarns of merino wool, silk and cashmere. The colours and textures draw inspiration from the landscape surrounding the weaving workshop at the foothills of the Mourne Mountains. Gentle muted tones mix with flecks and flashes of complimentary and contrasting colours to reflect the granite outcrops, grazing sheep, clusters of heather or bursts of gorse that speckle the scenery.

Each piece is unique, meticulously and individually handwoven on vintage shuttle looms, that are almost a century old. This technique creates a rich weave full of character and a hard-wearing woven selvedge, or self-finished edge. Stay snug and keep the cold at bay wrapped up in a Mourne Textiles scarf.

Mourne Textiles is a third-generation, family-run design-led manufacturer of handwoven scarves and homewares based in County Down, Northern Ireland.

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Deborah Tseng is a London based designer and artist. She combines her extensive education in crafts with traditions and ideas from a range of visual arts.

She is inspired by repetition, by decay, by time and by the minutiae of the world around her. She hand makes all of her objects and jewellery in porcelain and metal.

Her work layers varying subtle and deliberate textures, all shrouded in the colour white. This disguises the intricacy and invites the observer to look closely or physically interact with the work.

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I’m based in London and have been making jewellery for over 10 years. I always try to make jewellery is to always make something that speaks… the bumps, faults and tarnishes are as much as essential part of my work as the quality of the metals and the stones; I want my jewellery to have its own voice, to be joyful and to become more of a companion than a decoration.

For the most part I’m self taught but I’ve had lots of amazing help from tutors all around the world… Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Süd Tirol (Italy), Wellington (New Zealand) & London.

I love working with people. I’ve taught lots and lots of people how to make their own jewellery and also worked on hundreds of bespoke commissions.

Where possible, I try to used fair-trade or recycled materials, including my metals, stones and packaging.

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Jo Waterhouse is an illustrator and textile designer based in the town of Hitchin, Hertfordshire. Jo studied at the Dartington College of Arts and originally worked in antiques before starting her illustrative practice. During this time she learnt about historic materials and designs – elements that have greatly influenced her work. Jo Waterhouse’s pieces draw heavily on her surroundings and British folk traditions. Her characterful illustrations are lush with patterns, textures and surprising details.

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William Waterhouse is a multi-disciplinary kinetic designer producing installations, furniture and homewares in Peckham, London. William’s process is an exploration of materials driven by a thirst for new techniques. Movement and mechanisation characterise his work, from lively fanned chandeliers to kinetic wooden toys.

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Life is getting more and more connected, online, busy, rushed, shared. Our use of the natural resources given to us, more and more abstracted and commoditised. The things we use and surround ourselves with in our day-to-day lives are getting cheaper, mass produced, destined to last less and less My reaction to this is to spend some real time making the most basic things in life – something to eat with, something to eat from, something to sit on. To make them well, with an understanding and respect for trees they came from.

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Wooden + Woven is the creation of Alexander De vol. I have been making things my whole life, things of all forms and functions.

I believe in a simple, honest approach to design where aesthetics and utility are intrinsic. There is a distinct and individual quality in well made, slow made, and hand made things which begins with the story of their making and continues on with each use.
The pieces you’ll find here are intended to be more than just utensils, they should mellow with age and make the otherwise mundane tasks of scooping, stirring & sipping handsome & homely.

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I mainly make tableware and home decor objects. I work now mostly on the potter’s wheel and apply surface decorating techniques that stem from Japanese and Korean traditions such as shinogi, mishima and kohiki or carve the clay surface using Japanese chisels for wood-printing.

The inspirations for my work come from a wide range of archeological artefact, everyday objects, the forms in the nature as well as materials and processes in ceramics and other crafts. Through my work I am trying to explore the beauty and materiality while obtaining the functions of everyday objects.

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