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Festival of Colour

Festival of Colour / Friday 29th May 2020 - Saturday 29th August 2020

Coronavirus/Covid-19 has caused the postponement of this exhibition

This display celebrates colour in various forms. Colour brings warmth and energy to our lives and interior spaces, allowing us to represent our individuality. This show includes affordable gifts, useful homewares to enhance decor and wearable pieces which make a statement. The range of media will include ceramics, glass, jewellery, leather, rope baskets, textiles and more. All are beautifully handmade and high in quality.

The display will include some of our favourite makers from over the years. It will also introduce some new makers who will display will us for the first time. Exhibitors are Helen Chatterton, Kat Christou, Carla Edwards, Emma Farnworth, Alice Funge, Jessica Geach, Nawal Gebreel, Dennis Hales, Syrah Jay, Silvia K Ceramics, Ekta Kaul, Rebecca Killen, Gilly Langton, Jenny Llewellyn, Angie Packer, Sarah Packington, Janine Partington, Iain Perry, Prints & Press, Reptile Tiles, Shakspeare Glass, Sarah Went and more to be confirmed shortly.

There will be also be a special preview event on Saturday 30th May from 2-4pm, an ideal opportunity to browse the displays.

 

From the Blog

We are re-opening

June 12th

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Our beautiful map scarves feature some top travel destinations.

All of the City on Cloth scarves are designed by Helen who chooses the map, edits the colours and images which are then digitally printed and the scarves finished in Macclesfield. The scarves have machine rolled hems and are dry clean only.

Image : Yeshen Venema

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Kat founded her studio in Loughborough after completing a decorative arts degree at Nottingham Trent University. She creates decorative yet functional pieces in jewel like colours to adorn the living space working with both fused and blown glass.

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Carla Edwards designs and makes contemporary jewellery from her workshop in Leith, Edinburgh.

Inspiration comes from a love of the natural world, pattern, colour and drawing. The small details of plants fascinate Carla and she enjoys translating elements of drawings into wearable jewellery. Pieces are influenced by sketches from her garden, walks in the woods and the famous Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh.

Resin has huge range of colour possibilities and the variety of pattern, translucency, form and finish that can be achieved with the material is never ending. Each piece is made my hand with patterns turning out a little different each time, so no two pieces are exactly the same.

Techniques used are mould making, casting, filing, carving and polishing resin. These are alongside traditional metalworking techniques such as soldering, piercing and hammering.

Carla graduated from Edinburgh College of Art in 1997 with a BA(Hons) and in 1998 with a PGDip, both in Applied Art and Design, Jewellery and Silversmithing. Established in 1999.

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Colour and pattern have been a constant source of fascination and excitement for me and are the strongest influences on my work. An enduring interest in Japan, particularly Japanese textiles, has informed several of my jewellery projects. . An avid collector of Kimono, often age and flaws would mean the vintage garments I found were not in a condition to be worn but I wanted to find ways to recycle those exquisite fabrics into something that can be worn again.

My kikyo (bellflower) and ume (plum) blossom shape brooches are inspired by traditional ‘Tsumami Kanzashi’- the beautiful folded silk hairpieces usually worn with formal kimono and by Geisha.

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Inspired by a love of baking, Alice has created a range of functional ceramic kitchenware which is decorated with poured coloured slips that imitate the marks the ingredients make within each object. She adds words and recipes to the inside rims of mixing bowls and the outside of other pieces including measuring jugs and lidded jars.

All the recipes are handwritten by Alice’s late grandmother which gives a narrative to her work and has become an inspiring story which many can relate to; with most people having old recipes passed down between generations. Ever since she had the idea to produce a range of kitchenware she wanted to add something special to it – her late grandmother’s own handwritten recipes seemed the perfect idea, adding a personal touch to an already unique, handmade collection.

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I am fascinated by the process of creating 3D objects. My favourite material to work with is unbleached cotton rope because the way it is braided makes it so soft, tactile & fantastically strong, whilst still being wonderfully flexible.

I have a relationship with the industrial sewing machine I use to stitch the rope together. It’s about finding pleasure in creating forms through repetitive motion. I enjoy the contrast between the automated motion of the machine, versus the softness of the fibres. The machine physically creates the boundaries of size and scale and I work to find what I can create within those borders.

Pattern and colour dictate the rhythm of my creative journey. I am most often inspired by the natural world and choose to interpret this as abstract patterns onto the rope forms that I create. Sometimes I do this as I stitch the form together, or if the shape allows I might do this afterwards. I aim to create forms that have form & function.

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Nawal is a Liverpool-based textile designer.

One of the main influences on her work are the shapes, textures and the rhythms of nature. Other influences include Japanese paper-folding and shibori techniques. She has travelled widely in Europe, America, Russia, Pakistan, China and Japan.

Nawal uses innovative 3-dimensional fabric manipulation techniques to produce luxurious scarves and wraps. She uses a wide range of sumptuous fabrics and colours to give her pieces individuality.

Recent commissions have included the Royal Academy shop in London, The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, The Guggenheim Museum, Museum of Art & Design in New York and the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Her work is sold at a select range of boutiques, galleries and museum shops in the UK, Europe, USA and Japan.

 

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My love of wood and the use of colour and gilded finishes are reflected in a wide range of decorative turned pieces. The range of work includes fruit displays, wall plates, bowls and gilded boxes. Local white woods, sycamore, holly, and ash provide a three dimensional canvas for water soluble dyes and gilded finishes of gold silver and copper

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I first opened for business in 2007, with a range of handmade felt jewellery and accessorises, combining traditional wet felting, needle felting and sewing techniques. Since then I have developed collections of jewellery using wood, cork and concrete. Using everyday materials really inspires me to create something beautiful and unique from the ordinary. I am lucky enough to sell my designs through several galleries and boutiques throughout the U.K and abroad. As well as participate in seasonal craft events and pop ups.

I love to create bold and colourful jewellery that is a joy to wear, and I take inspiration from all manner of sources from fine art, photography and architecture to the world of fashion and interior design.

 

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Located in the heart of Brighton on the south coast of the UK, Silvia established her eponymous studio shortly after graduation in 2012. Reflecting her commitment to authenticity, every aspect of production takes place in-house.

Silvia’s drawings inform the models from which she makes her moulds; she also mixes casting slip, makes glazes, cuts leather straps – nothing is outsourced. Silvia spent four years at the University of Brighton, graduating with an MDes in Ceramics and Visual Research in 2012.

Silvia K Ceramics has won awards such as Elle Decoration Design Awards 2016 and New Designers One Year On 2013.

Alongside her growing business, Silvia worked as a technical demonstrator in the University of Brighton Ceramics Department from 2015-17 where she gained exceptional teaching experience specialising in hand building techniques, surface decoration and mould making. She now runs small group classes in her studio.

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London based textile designer Ekta Kaul’s work celebrates a love of linear rhythms and bold colour. Her graphic compositions are inspired by text and handwriting. Ekta explores these through embroidery, needle punching and silk-screen printing.Ekta’s multiway scarves can be worn in different ways. They have loops and silk buttons on either side and can be worn in different styles depending on how the buttons are linked to the loops.

A myriad of experiences gained through living in Britain and India influence Ekta’s work. She combines these influences to create a uniquely contemporary and sophisticated aesthetic.

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The Bay Collection is directly inspired by the ever changing splendour of Dundrum Bay (Northern Ireland) where Rebecca’s home is situated. ‘Each morning I am greeted and blessed with the most wonderful views which spread across the bay, leading to the majestic Mountains of Mourne’. The winter morning skies streaked with pink and gold are a beautiful contrast to the stunning shades of summer blues that encompass the bay throughout the warmer months. Each piece in the Bay Collection is completely unique with marbled bone china, painterly brush strokes and hints of gold lustre.

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Gilly Langton is a contemporary jewellery designer based in the remote Highland village of Plockton on the West Coast of Scotland. Gilly has been creating her bold sterling silver and elastic jewellery since 1997, selling and exhibiting in galleries, museums and fairs all over the world. Gilly has created collection’s to show at Goldsmiths Fair, London, Museum of art and design, New York, Philadelphia Museum of art and design show, Philadelphia, Tate Modern, London and Origin Contemporary Craft Fair, London. Gilly has created exclusive commissions for the British Museum, London, creating the Great Court Jewellery Collection, followed by The Lowry Collection, Salford.
Her collections combine her love of fashion and design, creating bold pieces that are both everyday and catwalk.

Specialties: Creating silver, gold and hand dyed elastic jewellery using a wide range of techniques and processes.

Mentoring new makers on many creative development programmes including Emergents, Fashion foundry and Hi-arts.

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Jenny Llewellyn is an East London based jewellery designer. Since graduating from Middlesex University in 2007, she has continued to develop her practice and research into the use of translucent silicone in her jewellery.

Jenny works with silicone and precious metals to create pieces inspired by the luminous colours, shapes and movement of creatures from the deep sea. Her continued experimentation with silicone is what drives her design process. Playing with silicones limitless properties and translucent nature, she incorporate subtle colour fades and sensual shape to create vibrant playful jewellery. (With the extra hidden element that all pieces glow in the dark!)

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“I am a metal and glass designer/maker. My work is instinctive and often my ideas only emerge as I work; experimentation and freedom to explore is key to my practice. Glass has a fluidity which gives me creative freedom, being almost alive; in contrast, metal requires a more formal approach. I love the difference between these materials and the diverse working methods constantly excite and challenge me to produce innovative work. I often combine glass and metal, each being evident in the final piece, otherwise the metal is only present in the impression that it leaves behind.

I believe that interacting with other artists within a community-based project would be mutually beneficial and I am particularly interested in opportunities to collaborate, share and enhance my practice.”

-Angie Packer

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Sarah Packington’s new Construction range of acrylic jewellery is inspired by the urban built environment: the frequent sight of building sites both in her hometown of Brighton and from trains into London. A palette of tinted greys, neutrals and glass colour is influenced by high-rise architecture, highlighted by flashes of bright orange, red and blue like warning lights and safety equipment. The shapes are individually cut using a bandsaw, making each piece unique and subtly asymmetrical. The edges are then sanded and dyed black giving a bold dark outline to each component, adding a dramatic touch.

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Janine Partington explores mark making and colour through the carving and painting of leathers and other materials to create distinctive and appealing surfaces. The simplicity of the process, the hand of the maker being visible, is important to her. Janine is constantly working towards the creation of a distinctive visual language in her chosen medium – experimenting with marks, composition and colour, playing with form and layering. Janine loves the freedom of working instinctively, each mark responding to the presence of what has come before. This creates a fluid environment where she can work in different dimensions, on the wall, on the table, on the floor.

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Iain Perry is an artist and screenprinter who runs Print Garage, creating deeply layered, colour saturated, slow motion screen prints. Iain is also co-director of Unit Twelve Gallery, a contemporary craft gallery based in Stafford in the West Midlands.

He describes own working practice thus: “The image generation is a slow process of experimentation, of trial and error; collecting imagery, developing patterns and overlaying all the different elements until new and intriguing relationships emerge. The results are brightly lit beacons of balearic zen shining out amidst a visual, digital landscape that is in constant upheaval, upgraded and updated daily.”

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“I work with shape and colour to create patterns. I like clean, graphic shapes and bold, simple design. Most of my work starts out as collage pieces as I especially love cutting up paper and playing with the possibilities that come with seeing how shapes and colours work together. I’ve taken some of my designs and had them printed onto fabric, from which I have created a range of cushions and tea towels.”

– Alison Greyer (Prints & Press)

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Reptile design and produce highly original hand painted tiles and ceramics full of colour, pattern and humour. We work in our purpose built studio in West Wales, on the border of Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire.

We established Reptile in 1988, in the same year that we married. We are both fine art graduates, only discovering the wonders of ceramics at evening classes with Angus Suttie in Lambeth and then with Don Dewar in Bolt Court – both highly inspirational teachers.

In 1992 we started to produce large tile panels for Waitrose supermarkets for their fish and meat counters. We were also selling tiles and wall plaques through Liberty as well as tile shops and craft galleries throughout Britain. We soon needed more space and relocated from Highgate to our present location.

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This range has a lovely satin feel to it. A sandblasted finish with a thin trail of orange and yellow shooting around the pieces. Originally based on a group of rocks in Wales, like many of my ideas they have evolved and changed over the years.

I set up Shakspeare Glass in 1988 and have my own glass studio and gallery in Taunton, Somerset which is where I blow glass. I make what I hope is a distinctive and original range of studio or art glass, whichever you prefer. As well as having my own workshop in Taunton, Shakspeare Glass also supplies our ranges of glass bowls, vases, baubles, paperweights etc to a number of other galleries around the UK.

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I make wheel thrown porcelain domestic ware decorated with textural accents. My work lies in the tradition of English slipware, but is contemporary in approach. Pieces can be mixed to form collections based on simplified natural patterns that interplay between shape and colour. Clean lines and subtle textures combine to create understated objects that can be used and enjoyed on a daily basis.

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