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Monochrome

Monochrome / Saturday 17th November 2018 - Saturday 12th January 2019

‘Monochrome’ is a mixed media exhibition that explores the work of makers who use one colour. Artists use mark making, contrasting surfaces, textures and shades to allow the artistic process to take precedence.

 

Confirmed artists include Sarah Packington, Chung Tyson Workshop, Lanty Ball, Miriam Maselkowski, Helen Rankin, Antonella GiomarelliKatharina Klug, Clare HillerbyLauren Nauman,  Richard McVetis, Helaina Sharpley , Sue Gregor,  Tracey Birchwood , Claire Lowe, Jessica Briggs, Hilary Brown and   Vanessa Hogge. 

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I have been designing and making acrylic jewellery in Brighton since graduating in Wood, Metal, Ceramics and Plastics BA(hons) at Brighton Polytechnic in 1991.

I strive to use acrylic in an innovative and personal way, finding new ways to give a potentially cold, mass produced material a precious hand worked feel.

I am drawn to interesting textures, colours and patterns in ceramics, textiles, paintings, architecture and in nature. I like simple, light and joyful shapes in subtle colours.

I enjoy playing with the properties of clear dyed acrylic: light, reflection, and strong colour. I hand manipulate the surface using etching, sanding, dying and polishing, and use contrasts of polished/matte and colour/clear to add interest.

I aim for a highly finished quality to give my jewellery a precious feel, and I hope my designs are unique, fun and a pleasure to wear.

My jewellery is sold in galleries around the UK. In 2014 a special collection was sold in the Tate Modern ‘Matisse Cut Outs’ exhibition gift shop, and in Spring 2017 The British Museum sold a collection with its ‘American Dream’ prints exhibition.

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My core practice consists in designing and making ceramics by hand. I take a minimal approach to form, favouring simple thrown or slip cast vessels that act as canvases for my surface designs. I take my inspiration from natural surfaces, textures and patterns.

For the past three years I have specialised in working with porcelain, creating both glazed and unglazed pieces. I am particularly interested in exploring the contrast between the textured and smooth surfaces. After firing, this contrast is accentuated by grinding and polishing the vitrified clay.

Over the past year I have been developing water etched surfaces and I will be showcasing some of this new work alongside my original carved pieces at upcoming events.

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Chung Tyson Workshop are a multi disciplinary design studio based in Manchester.They are architect-makers with a passion for design through making having over 20 years experience in the fields of architecture, design and education.

Their projects range from product design and set construction for television to small-scale buildings. Inspired by the pioneering spirit of mid century modern design, they re-appropriate materials typically found in building projects into everyday objects.

TIDY is designed with their special drawing implements in mind collected over the years and stored away in drawers, now proudly displayed and put to use.

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My work explores the boundaries within clay through experimental processes. I start with the industrial method of plaster moulds and slip-casting; however, I don’t always use these in traditional ways. With my current project Lines, I use metal as an aesthetic reference and material contrast. An additive method is used to create pieces with minimal amounts of clay. This body of work became an engaging display of how clay moves in the kiln. The suggestions of vessels start out as straight cages of wet clay and through the power of the kilns heat and the pyroplasticity of the clay, they move like fabric to evolve into a wire-like sculpture that still holds the materiality of porcelain. Due to this process, the final form of each piece stems from minute details in the making, but mostly depends on chance.

 

Image by Sylvain Deleu

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I make portraits by wrapping thread around hundreds of nails. More thread is added to create darker areas of tone. Over time, an image emerges from the random lines of thread which is quite magical to witness.

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My work is about the simplicity of design and shape, bringing these in relationship to the surface. I am inspired by the elemental colour and shape of ancient Korean pottery. What I love about ceramic is that it starts off as a soft lump and can become pretty much anything you want it to be. After the firing, it is hard and durable and can survive centuries. But at the same time, it’s fragile and can be broken into pieces in a moment. I aim to create timeless vessels for the contemporary interior.

Each piece is individually made from porcelain on the potter’s wheel. Naïve, spontaneous pencil strokes drawing graphic simple patterns that create movement and direction. Every line is drawn by hand which makes the work preserve the moment of making. The imperfection of the patterns make it lively, rough and immediate and unique, still holding an order or direction to bind them together. The Narrative of my work is coming from little snippets of observation in my environment. Lines are jumping out on me in almost anything – stripes on cloth, wires, cables, plants and grasses, architecture and streets just to name a few.

After growing up in my mother’s pottery I trained professionally at college in Austria and Germany for 6 years. I set up business in Cambridge in 2011 and have been given the silver award 2013 by Craft and Design magazine in the ceramic category. In 2014 I was chosen to participate in the Crafts Councils Hot House program. Since then I have become a selected member of the Craft Potters Association.

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Helen’s jewellery exudes modernity and simplicity. Her signature aesthetic is defined by angles, interlocking, overlapping, contrast and scale. Crisp lines and blacked silver add drama whilst semi precious stones provide colour and interest. Inspiration comes from modern architecture, geometric decorative features and repetitive pattern found in textiles and tiles and works from the 50s Brazilian Concrete art movement.

Helen utilises rapid prototyping technology to achieve perfect symmetry and combines it with traditional jewellery techniques. Meticulous hand finishing maintains a luxury feel to the collections. The ultimate focus however is always on movement and wearability,

Helen graduated with a BA in Jewellery design at Middlesex University and is now working from her workshop at Brass Monkeys in Hove, East Sussex.

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Observations of the minutia within the everyday inspire my work. I seek to identify the beauty in the banal and to reinterpret overlooked yet familiar objects.

A tattered strip of plastic parcel strap, a lonely knot of string, a delicate wrap of thread, in silver and given permanence become monuments to their former sellers. The wearing of these ignored and discarded objects as jewellery acknowledges the presence of beauty in the most remarkable of places and what was once invisible to us can become and object of intrigue.

In the creation of this romantic narrative I hope to place value in the most ordinary and everyday aspects of life.

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At once organic and ornate, spontaneous and stylised, Vanessa Hogge’s decorative wallflowers bring a unique textural and visual dimension to any wall or table.

Working predominantly in porcelain, Vanessa crafts her one-off flowerheads and vessels in her studio in Cockpit Arts Holborn. Grounded by years of expertise as a ceramicist, she takes an instinctive, visceral approach to each piece, painstakingly sculpting every petal and anther by hand so that no two flowers are identical.

The efflorescent flowers are created in porcelain and black clay, and are fired to high temperatures to create brittle, ossified shades of white and lava-like black.

Inspired by her passion for all things botanical, and influences as diverse as Frida Kahlo, Indian miniature paintings and Marianne North, Vanessa breathes life into her clay in the form of dahlias, chrysanthemums, daisies, hydrangeas and daphne.

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My  artistic practice  centres  on  my  training as  an  embroiderer through  the  use of  traditional  hand  stitch  techniques and  mark  making. Using  laboured  and meticulously  worked  wools and  multiples  of  embroidered dots  and  crosses, I  explore  the similarities  between  pen on  paper  and thread  on  fabric,  employing a  limited  vocabulary of  mark  making and  deliberately  subdued colour  to  create  a  binary simplicity.

The  work I  create  reflects a  preoccupation  with the  repetitive  nature of  process,  exploring the  subtle  differences that  emerge  through ritualistic  and  habitual making.  In  addition, the  mapping  of  space  and marking  time  and form  are  central themes.  I  explore the  way  time and  place  are felt,  experienced  and constructed.  Ideas  are often  developed  in response  to,  or created  specifically  to  a moment,  visualising  and making  this  a tactile  and  tangible object.  The  pieces created  explore  how  objects, materials  and  places, through  the  action of  hands,  bear witness  to  the passing  of  time.

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I am a designer/maker, based in West Yorkshire, creating 2D and 3D wirework.

My work originated from the love of tea and tea drinking, but has since moved into other areas. These include Edwardian and seaside architecture, grandfather clocks and pocket watches.

Using old sepia photographs, I first create pen and ink drawings, capturing the aspects of elegance. These are then translated delicate and intricate wirework pieces, crossing the boundaries between drawing and sculpture. The simplicity of the black iron wire on the calico backing board, create subtle shadows and delicate movement.

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After graduating from Edinburgh College of Art in 1997 with a BA (Hons) in Jewellery and Silversmithing, I received a Start-Up Grant in 1998 from the Scottish Arts Council and established my workshop and business in Edinburgh. Throughout the years I have won many awards and taken part in many exhibitions and fairs

I continue to design and make one-off and limited edition jewellery to sell through selected galleries and shops around the UK. More recently I have been creating unique collages utilising more of the found ephemera that I gather

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Each piece is individually handmade using real flowers and leaves to create the designs. I collect, dry and press leaves and flowers and then use them to create the designs using a process of working with acrylic, which I developed. The leaves perish in the process, so each piece is unique as all leaves and flowers differ from one another. They are like a fossil or a memory of the leaf or flower.

Made from 100% recycled and recyclable acrylic, which is free from volatile organic compounds and hydrofluorocarbon and so more environmentally friendly.

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Tracey graduated in 3-Dimensional Design from Brighton University where she majored in ceramics. Tracey is from Manchester and after her degree she moved back home and in 1996 established her studio at the Manchester Craft & Design Centre in the city’s Northern Quarter.

These stunning collections are made from porcelain and are intricately wrapped with very fine wire. Geometric patterns feature strongly and all the surface decoration is precisely applied. Tracey’s original collection incorporates silver wire with coloured porcelain and each piece has a subtle yet glittery appearance. In contrast the funky collection incorporates a medley of strong vibrant colours in bold stripes and checks.

This innovative range combines Tracey’s trademark porcelain with enamelled copper wire. The newest collection ‘Tassel’ is more feminine and glamorous! Each individual piece combines very simple fittings with multiple porcelain drops.

In December 2015 Tracey’s work was featured in Bluecoat Display Centre’s Christmas exhibition titled ‘All That Glitters’.

Tracey said of this collection – “This jewellery is made from small clusters of hand formed porcelain, all carefully linked together to form shimmery earrings and pendants. I mostly make quite little delicate pieces. A lot of my designing I do as I make – ideas tend to naturally progress and inspire the next designs. I am always influenced by the natural world – whether it’s the spirals on a seed cone or the petals circling a flower – a lot of what I am drawn to is always quite geometric and repetitive in pattern.”

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laire set up her contemporary jewellery business in 2005 after graduating from London Metropolitan University. Claire studied Silversmithing, Jewellery and allied crafts. This was a varied course with lots of experimentation with materials which suited Claire’s textile background.

Claire’s most recent collection focuses on the use of three colours to create a selective palette within a collection of jewellery. The design process has allowed Claire to experiment with colours and shapes to create a unusual selection of jewellery. Claire has enjoyed the freedom of creating a new collection, being able to play with new ideas and designs whilst making in her studio.

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Jessica originally studied Printed and Woven Textile Design at Manchester. Later, her love of drawing, texture, pattern and colour was matched by her discovery of and love for metal. She has combined these passions in jewellery-making for the last 16 years, finding infinite expression in the exploration, experimentation and refinement of her inspirations and techniques.

In her early daisy pieces (not shown), Jessica used gold leaf to bring colour, contrast and life to the crafted flowers. However, whilst studying for an MA at Sheffield, she learnt an ancient Korean technique for fusing gold to silver. This opened up a whole new methodology. Making the technique her own and using it in conjunction with increasingly sophisticated texturing of sheet silver, Jessica established an individual and identifiable way of working.

Design ideas evolve and develop, but periodically flowers or floral patterns re-surface, re-interpreted in a more contemporary style. All designs, whatever the inspiration are translated into elegant pieces with subtle textures or more complex and layered finishes. There is always an inherent simplicity of both form and function. Each item is handcrafted by Jessica in her workshop and thus the characteristics of all aspects of the work are under constant review.

The result is an ever-changing range of very wearable jewellery including cuffs, rings, earrings, neckpieces, brooches, and men’s jewellery.

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The work I am currently making is the result of experiments with very thin sheet silver – the manipulation of it and fixing it to shape using soldering and riveting techniques. It is the distillation of many ideas and influences. Crumpled, creased and rolled paper; ancient Roman, Egyptian and Minoan jewellery; ethnic jewellery; found objects such as stones, shells, bones – spontaneously picked up and threaded onto rough string or twisted plant fibre.

Looking back to the work I was producing over 30 years ago I see that familiar themes keep emerging. This early work used thin sheet acrylic but my concerns were still with reduction of thickness, erosion, lightness and simplicity of form and ethnic influences.

At the moment, the jewellery I produce is silver – sometimes, blackened with oxidising chemical and other pieces plated with 24 carat gold. Every piece I make is a development on the last, how can it be improved what have I learnt what do I still need to learn.

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